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Clicked on an SE ad from this site. Ensues a survey of my personal information which in the first 10 screens never attempted to talk about my view of SE or SE sites... Just mining personal details. Is the community OK with this? Definitely not a "pulse" survey. Probably one of the most invasive surveys I have seen since early Facebook.

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    There are ads on SE sites? Ad-blockers FTW!
    – FreeMan
    May 17 at 17:42

1 Answer 1

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This is actually the type of question handled for all SE sites on Meta Stack Exchange But the short answer is: No, the community is not OK with this, but the community has no control over SE's ads, surveys, policies, UI changes, etc.

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    I just posted it here because I was not sure the survey was on all sites. Had like 6-7 questions about race, gender identification, occupation and then a bunch of "work satisfaction" things. I just put something in and hit next to see on invasive they were getting. Honestly it has been YEARS since I have seen something like that and the fact that most users would be logged in. I can't imagine the GDPR regulations that SE is breaking. A hefty fine or lawsuit is deserved here. No way they are not linking that info to your account - which in most cases uses SSO.
    – DMoore
    Feb 14 at 18:04
  • Actually, it is quite possible that they are not linking results to your account, but only setting a flag on the account to know you have completed the survey so that they don't ask you again. But that is, of course, impossible for any of us to tell. Ignoring GDPR (and similar privacy/etc.) issues, I have a lot of fundamental problems with both the general types of questions asked and with some of the specific details. Not just with SE - with a lot of surveys. But especially with SE as the connection between the questions and what they claim to want to "survey' is tenuous at best. Feb 14 at 18:07
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    I am posting it on meta and probably going to get 5000 downvotes. I completely understand what you are saying - actually I am pretty in charge of this at our organization. Even if I flag your account for completion and do nothing else - which I highly highly doubt that given the extensive survey.... The flag timestamp and survey timestamp are basically synced (and that is just the most simplistic method). GDPR examples show that an inference in cross extracting like this is a violation. Which it should be because a 13 year old could create a cross tab to do it.
    – DMoore
    Feb 14 at 18:11
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    Actually, you will probably get 500 upvotes, and someone from SE will post an Answer which will get 500 downvotes. Feb 14 at 18:41
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    Just in case anyone wonders how SE reacts to this. Mods/Employees bashed me on my question, they then acted like I didn't know what I was talking about or was lying. However I built a plugin for qualtrics (salesforce driven survey tool) a few years back and understood everything. After I posted screen shots and responded to the mods they scrubbed half of the things I said (proof), then they readjusted the survey to actually make it anonymous, then they banned me from meta SE for a month for not being nice. LOL
    – DMoore
    Mar 21 at 19:32
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    That's what happens, @DMoore, when you point out the failures in the "logic" some people/organizations make when trying to support their cause - you get banned for not following the herd.
    – FreeMan
    May 17 at 17:45
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    This attitude and their "politics"... example it was OK to ask Jewish people about violence from Jews. But if you said a word about Muslims committing violence you were banned or comments/answers scrubbed. Several people at my company commented about things like this happening and they lost our account. We were set to spend 1.2-1.5m a year with SE. This company will be done in 5-6 years. No large company can risk dealing with them.
    – DMoore
    May 30 at 20:40

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